Friday 19 October 2018

CorkHi17°| Lo11°

Cork Independent

Cork Profile

Jessica Carson, artist and lecturer in CIT Crawford School of Art Jessica Carson Artist and lecturer in CIT Crawford School of Art

Thursday, 15th September, 2016 1:00am

Name: Jessica Carson

Lives: Carrigtwohill

Family: Partner, Herman, and son, Otto (1)

Pets: No

Favourite thing about Cork: Good creative, personal and working relationships

Least favourite thing about Cork: There are still a few dirty corners

One thing you would change about Cork: Raise profile of Cork Airport to bring Sendai, Atlanta, Medillín and Banbridge closer.

Jessica Carson is an artist and lecturer in CIT Crawford School of Art; more recently she has also been part of the team of curators behind the exciting and utterly relevant art project running in Cork, Perceptions 2016: The Art of Citizenship.

Perceptions 2016 is a centenary-focused partnership project supported by Cork City Council Arts Office, Crawford Art Gallery and CIT Crawford College of Art and Design, built on the success of the 2013 Art of Inclusion exhibition. The exhibition runs until 29 October across 10 venues with an exciting programme of workshops, talks, tours, screenings, meet the artist events, a symposium and interactive activity postcard kits.

Jessica remembers: “In 2013 we brought together 50 artists from eight studios that we had developed a connection with. It was such a success, the Crawford had a huge increase in footfall. 32,000 people visited the exhibition. From the comments book we saw there were a lot of return visits too. Based on the success, the three partners came together for a new project.”

The scope of Perceptions 2016 is massive, Jessica explains. “We made a global open call for submissions from artists for Perceptions and eventually narrowed it down to 141 artists. We selected more work than intended because the high quality from 32 studios.”

The artwork has been selected from worldwide submissions from artists working in supported studios, which are spaces offering opportunities to artists who may previously have been unable to develop their arts practice due to barriers such as a physical lack of access to materials or opportunity, or because of as limited expectations of them as a result of having been labelled as having a disability.

This exhibition full of high quality of artwork but it is about more than that, Jessica says. “It’s not just about getting the artwork up on the wall but about discussion and engagement in topics such as citizenship and brings a diverse range of voices and intelligences. And because of that we’ve developed an extensive educational and interactive programme to go with it.”

The public are invited to interact with the art in various manners to prompt a real dialogue around creativity, ability and the active role that the arts can play within our communities. It is this idea of public engagement and inclusion which has captivated Jessica over many projects.

”From school I went to art college and at that time I needed art to connect to real life and real people and not just be sitting in a studio. I couldn’t find tutors at the time who had experience with art in a social context. It wasn’t until the preparation of my degree show when I met Hughie O’Donaghue, the external examiner, that I had meaningful dialogue with someone who understood what I striving for. That encounter really helped my understand my own work.”

Jessica found a purpose in Mayfield Arts Centre where over 15 years she coordinated local and international art projects with myriad social groups and cultural organisations.

“I felt the potential of art to connect people with themselves, their dreams and their values as well as to connect with others,” she said. “I saw how art brings energy and can support us in becoming active about the things that concern us.”

“Key themes and interests in the work were around creativity, connection empathy and citizenship, with the essence asking what does it mean to belong to a street, a community, a town, a club, Cork, Ireland, Europe or the world.”

While there, Jessica worked with her team to establish CÚIG (Creativity Unlimited and Integrated Group), a group of five artists who are employed as artists in residence. Each of these artists had faced barriers in progressing their career and identity as artists. They are supported by a mentoring process and put on school and community workshops for the public.

More recently, Jessica has worked with CIT Crawford. “Nora Furlong and I initiated a programme now known as Creativity and Change (level 8) with the support of the Department of Arts in Community and Health Practices and is about the connection between creativity, global citizenship and justice and change.”

With her growing involvement in the institute she has been helping develop student’s work by engaging with supported art studios, such as GASP, which will feature in Perceptions.

As well as host the artists, Jessica discussed with her Department the potential to link the college and the GASP artists with innovative projects in Bristol and Madrid to exchange practices and to give the artists the opportunity to expand internationally.

The idea was developed in a programme called Expanding Realities, which is running parallel to Perceptions 2016. “We were delighted to receive funds from Erasmus Plus to connect three studios – Debajo El Sombrero, Madrid, Art in Motion, Bristol and GASP. We’ve had an exciting time with our partners so far and are excited about sharing this tale of a creative journey between these three cities through presentation of videos, installations and artwork during Perceptions 2016.”

Jessica’s brand of work has taken her beyond Europe, most noticeably to Medellín, Colombia, where she was given artist residency in the Museum of Modern Arts Medillín and the Paul Bardwell Gallery of Contemporary Art Medellín.

With the Paul Bardwell Gallery Jessica worked with an organisation providing services to people with disabilities: “The first project was quite explorative for me with the city and the people. The group I collaborated with wanted to make strong statement about how they have a right to belong in the city. They developed a phrase (‘It’s others that limit me’) and used the aesthetic of barricade tape and taped areas of the city where they didn’t feel welcome – restricted access areas for example.”

The parallels between Colombia and Ireland include a shared history of Catholicism and violence but what interests her more is the perception around public space and who owns it; the fear of space and who owns which territories. Art can put a public voice back into space.

“Another parallel is social exclusion of people with disabilities. The Proclamation declared its resolve to cherish ‘all of the children of the nation equally and oblivious of the differences … which have divided a minority from the majority in the past’. While 2016 is a time to remember the violent past, it is also an opportunity to re-imagine the future and to expand our perceptions of future possibilities for a brighter, more equal society.”

Find out more information on the trail by visiting perceptions2016.com, expandingrealities.eu and culturenightcork.ie.

Jessica Carson is an artist and lecturer in CIT Crawford School of Art; more recently she has also been part of the team of curators behind the exciting and utterly relevant art project running in Cork, Perceptions 2016: The Art of Citizenship.

Perceptions 2016 is a centenary-focused partnership project supported by Cork City Council Arts Office, Crawford Art Gallery and CIT Crawford College of Art and Design, built on the success of the 2013 Art of Inclusion exhibition. The exhibition runs until 29 October across 10 venues with a programme of workshops, talks, tours, screenings, meet the artist events, a symposium and interactive activity postcard kits.

“In 2013 we brought together 50 artists from eight studios that we had developed a connection with. It was such a success, the Crawford had a huge increase in footfall. 32,000 people visited the exhibition. Based on the success, the three partners came together for a new project.”

The scope of Perceptions 2016 is massive, Jessica explains. “We made a global open call for submissions from artists for Perceptions and eventually narrowed it down to 141 artists. We selected more work than intended because the high quality from 32 studios.”

The artwork has been selected from worldwide submissions from artists working in supported studios, which are spaces offering opportunities to artists who may previously have been unable to develop their arts practice due to barriers such as a physical lack of access to materials or opportunity, or because of as limited expectations of them as a result of having been labelled as having a disability.

This exhibition full of high quality of artwork but it is about more than that, Jessica says. “It’s not just about getting the artwork up on the wall but about discussion and engagement in topics such as citizenship and brings a diverse range of voices and intelligences. And because of that we’ve developed an extensive educational and interactive programme to go with it.”

The public are invited to interact with the art in various manners to prompt a real dialogue around creativity, ability and the active role that the arts can play within our communities. It is this idea of public engagement and inclusion which has captivated Jessica.

”From school I went to art college and at that time I needed art to connect to real life and real people and not just be sitting in a studio. I couldn’t find tutors at the time who had experience with art in a social context. It wasn’t until the preparation of my degree show when I met Hughie O’Donaghue, the external examiner, that I had meaningful dialogue with someone who understood what I striving for. That encounter really helped my understand my own work.”

Jessica found a purpose in Mayfield Arts Centre where over 15 years she coordinated local and international art projects with myriad social groups and cultural organisations. “I felt the potential of art to connect people with themselves, their dreams and their values as well as to connect with others,” she said. “I saw how art brings energy and can support us in becoming active about the things that concern us.”

“Key themes and interests in the work were around creativity, connection empathy and citizenship, with the essence asking what does it mean to belong to a street, a community, a town, a club, Cork, Ireland, Europe or the world.”

While there, Jessica worked with her team to establish CÚIG (Creativity Unlimited and Integrated Group), a group of five artists who are employed as artists in residence. Each of these artists had faced barriers in progressing their career and identity as artists. They are supported by a mentoring process and put on school and community workshops for the public.

More recently, Jessica has worked with CIT Crawford. “Nora Furlong and I initiated a programme now known as Creativity and Change (level 8) with the support of the Department of Arts in Community and Health Practices and is about the connection between creativity, global citizenship and justice and change.”

With her growing involvement in the institute she has been helping develop student’s work by engaging with supported art studios, such as GASP, which will feature in Perceptions.

As well as host the artists, Jessica discussed with her Department the potential to link the college and the GASP artists with innovative projects in Bristol and Madrid to exchange practices and to give the artists the opportunity to expand internationally.

The idea was developed in a programme called Expanding Realities, which is running parallel to Perceptions 2016. “We were delighted to receive funds from Erasmus Plus to connect three studios – Debajo El Sombrero, Madrid, Art in Motion, Bristol and GASP. We’ve had an exciting time with our partners so far and are excited about sharing this tale of a creative journey between these three cities through presentation of videos, installations and artwork during Perceptions 2016.”

Jessica’s work has taken her beyond Europe, most noticeably to Medellín, Colombia, where she was given artist residency in the Museum of Modern Arts Medillín and the Paul Bardwell Gallery of Contemporary Art Medellín.

With the Paul Bardwell Gallery Jessica worked with an organisation providing services to people with disabilities: “The first project was quite explorative for me with the city and the people. The group I collaborated with wanted to make strong statement about how they have a right to belong in the city. They developed a phrase (‘It’s others that limit me’) and used the aesthetic of barricade tape and taped areas of the city where they didn’t feel welcome – restricted access areas for example.”

The parallels between Colombia and Ireland include a shared history of Catholicism and violence but what interests her more is the perception around public space and who owns it; the fear of space and who owns which territories. Find out more info on the trail by visiting perceptions2016.com, expandingrealities.eu and culturenightcork.ie.

ePaper Service

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8
Desktop, Tablet & Smartphone friendly
Cookies on Cork Independent website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. We also use cookies to ensure we show you advertising that is relevant to you. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on the Cork Independent website. However, if you would like to, you can change your cookie settings at any time by amending your browser settings.
How does Cork Independent use cookies?
Cookies enable us to identify your device, or you when you have logged in. We use cookies that are strictly necessary to enable you to move around the site or to provide certain basic features. We use cookies to enhance the functionality of the website by storing your preferences, for example. We also use cookies to help us to improve the performance of our website to provide you with a better user experience.
We don't sell the information collected by cookies, nor do we disclose the information to third parties, except where required by law (for example to government bodies and law enforcement agencies).
Hide Message