Tuesday 21 May 2019

CorkHi12°| Lo

Cork Independent

Motors

Fiat’s Centoventi concept will become the new Panda

Wednesday, 13th March, 2019 4:34pm

The 2019 Geneva International Motor Show sees the debut of the Fiat Concept Centoventi, the concept car that expresses the Italian brand's idea of electric mass mobility in the near future.

It is the expression of a bold, future vision based on 120 years of history and experience - hence the name of the prototype that means one hundred and twenty in Italian - which, maintaining the tradition, is destined to break away from the past and push beyond.

Just as in the fifties, for example, when the Fiat 500 sparked an industrial and cultural revolution, overcoming traditional categories in looks, design and engineering to become a masterpiece unlike anything else in the automotive industry history - the first real example of mobility affordable to the mass market.

Basically, it’s the new Panda, but disguised with a thick sheen of concept-car gloss.

The Fiat Concept Centoventi can be built to the customers specification, creating a new business model involving Mopar - the FCA group division that specialises in accessories, parts and services and innovative product personalisation, through the sales network and increasingly digital customers.

Except for six features (bumpers, polycarbonate roof, colour, Lingotto instrument cluster, batteries and digital tailgate), which can only be installed at retailers, the other 114 accessories specially designed by Mopar - including the sound system, the dashboard and door storage compartments, the seat cushions, etc - can also be purchased online and fitted by the customer at their own home. What's more, some simply structured accessories, such as a cup-holder or a document-holder, for example, can actually be printed using a 3D printer, in the owner's home, at their dealership or at a specialist printing shop.

So this is a new business model for automotive accessories, enabling them to be resold or traded on the internet, nurturing a real community of brand fans or connoisseurs of Fiat's Italian design. This new business model is focused on ecommerce and virtual market.

The seats are innovative, too, with a bare structure made from eco-sustainable materials, while the cushions and head restraints can easily be replaced to change their colours and materials.

The front passenger seat can even be removed and substituted with a storage box or child seat if necessary. The rear seats consist of a retractable bench and a back which rotates to make a ‘trunk’ with extraordinary load capacity. The freedom to customise is also clear in the electrical power source that drives Fiat Concept Centoventi. It consists of a set of modular batteries offering the great possible flexibility of use.

As standard, the car comes with a factory-mounted battery with a range of 100km. But if a longer range is needed, up to three additional batteries, giving an increase of 100km each, can be purchased or hired.

The extra batteries are installed underneath the floor of the car, by the service network. A sliding rail which supports and connects the batteries makes their installation or removal particularly quick and easy.

An additional battery, for mounting under the seat, is also available; it can be disconnected and put on charge directly in the user's home or garage, just like the battery of a modern e-bike. The total range which can be achieved is 500km.

The way the car is designed, with the roll centre exactly midway between the two axle shafts, and the placing of the batteries underneath the vehicle's centre of gravity, mean that the car's weight distribution and handling are unchanged regardless of the number of batteries installed. The braking system is suitably sized to ensure maximum deceleration even when fully laden.

ePaper Service

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8
Desktop, Tablet & Smartphone friendly
Cookies on Cork Independent website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. We also use cookies to ensure we show you advertising that is relevant to you. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on the Cork Independent website. However, if you would like to, you can change your cookie settings at any time by amending your browser settings.
How does Cork Independent use cookies?
Cookies enable us to identify your device, or you when you have logged in. We use cookies that are strictly necessary to enable you to move around the site or to provide certain basic features. We use cookies to enhance the functionality of the website by storing your preferences, for example. We also use cookies to help us to improve the performance of our website to provide you with a better user experience.
We don't sell the information collected by cookies, nor do we disclose the information to third parties, except where required by law (for example to government bodies and law enforcement agencies).
Hide Message